Preparing Young Albertans for Work, Giving Them the Skills for Jobs

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“Apprenticeship learning has every bit as much value as academic learning, and skilled trades have every bit as much value, merit and worth as a university degree. A United Conservative government will create opportunities for young Albertans to learn practical job skills that meet the demands of the labour market and that will help them succeed and build prosperity for all Albertans. We will reinvent the vocational high school.”

  • Alberta faces the dual challenge of retirement among skilled workers and the worst youth employment in decades. The Department of Labour predicts that from now to 2025, more than 3,000 skilled workers will retire every year so we will have an ongoing demand for apprentices and skilled tradespeople. Alberta needs to get ahead of these trends.
  • These are the trades we rely on. These are many of the occupations that make Alberta’s economy run. So for the next generation of young Albertans with the right skills, there are going to be huge opportunities for jobs, to do well, and build a great life.
  • The NDP have failed these young people. We don’t want them leaving Alberta. The United Conservatives want to help prepare our young men and women to go to work and to give them hope for a great future - right here in Alberta.
  • The United Conservative plan will help young Albertans into apprenticeships, the skilled trades, and into vocational education.

A United Conservative government will:

Double the number of schools that CAREERS: Next Generation is currently working with, from 500 to 1,000,1 and quadruple the number of students placed with participating employers. 

CAREERS: Next Generation’ is a non-profit organization that matches Alberta students to employers through internships, camps, workshops and mentoring – including in the skilled trades.2 In 2018, there were 1,567 students enrolled in programs as varied as interning at Dow Chemicals, or the Royal Bank3.

CAREERS currently places 1,500 students and apprentices with industry placements but has developed a plan to reach 6,000 students and apprentices.

CAREERS: Next Generation has tremendous private-sector buy-in. Its partner companies and funders read like a “who’s-who” of Alberta’s most successful philanthropists and businesses.

CAREERS presently receives approximately $2 million per year from the provincial government.4

To achieve these ambitious goals, a UCP government would increase provincial funding to CAREERS by an extra $4.3 million annually by 2022/23 and $6 million by 2023/24.

Expand the number of students enrolled in the Registered Apprenticeship Program, (as part of the UCP commitment to CAREERS: Next Generation.)

The Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) is an opportunity for high school students to complete a high school diploma while also working as an indentured apprentice, earning credits. They build hours towards a Journeyman’s Certificate in one of Alberta’s more than fifty trades. Worksites are approved, a learning plan is established, and a teacher supervises the student’s experience.

RAP students are both full-time students and registered apprentices, dividing their school time between both approved work sites and their high school studies. They continue to take all the regular courses such as English, Language Arts, Social Studies and Math in order to obtain their high school diploma. Both the school and the employer agree on a schedule for the student.  

This allows the student to earn good wages and obtain as many as 40 high school credits.

For a semester, students work for half a day of each school day, for one or two days per week, including during summer holidays, and holidays and weekends during the school year.

The program ends when the apprentice finishes high school. This helps them get a head start by accumulating hours toward their ticket, completing health and safety training, and sometimes completing their first year of apprenticeship.

Graduating students are automatically registered as a regular apprentice and the credit earned while in the RAP program is applied to his or her apprenticeship through the apprenticeship program. At this time about 80 percent of their time will be spent on the job and the rest will be spent at a technical institute or college.

Once they have completed all necessary work hours and technical training, they become a certified journeyperson.

Offices are located in various cities and towns across Alberta.

Establish a new $1 million Trades Scholarship for 1,000 graduating secondary students who show promise in the trades in high school. This will be a new annual scholarship of $1,000 available in addition to existing scholarships.

The budget for the new scholarship is estimated to be $1 million per year and would enough to award up to 1,000 annual scholarships of $1,000 per recipient, including renewed scholarships of existing recipients (up to four years). 

Support the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology’s new collegiate in Edmonton5and aim to expand this model to Calgary and other centres. The province’s contribution under a United Conservative government will be $28 million towards the NAIT collegiate6 and we will also budget $28 million for a similar Calgary collegiate. 

A planned Edmonton high school, an alternative model that is reportedly the first of its kind in North America, will allow students to fast-track to their post-secondary education (PSE). The new collegiate, the result of a partnership between the Edmonton Catholic and Public School Boards, the Government of Alberta, and the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, will focus on students interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics courses, with students being able to earn PSE credits as early as grade 11. The school will be built on land just east of NAIT, allowing students to have access to the institution’s labs.

Reform teacher certification to enable qualified tradespeople to teach and bring their skills to the classroom without requiring a full Bachelor of Education.7

Given the time This excludes a huge pool of expertise that exists in the trades industries from teaching young students in the classroom. And many tradespersons will soon approach retirement. These individuals could bring their expertise and enthusiasm for the skilled trades into the classroom.

The goal here will be to replicate the training and certification now in effect at NAIT to become a Master Instructor (to teach at NAIT)8 but for schools across Alberta.

The University of Alberta currently runs a program called the Bridge to Teach program which supports journey certified tradespeople, health care, and information technology professionals to complete a one-year program to bridge to teacher certification. It only applies to 10 trades: auto mechanic, auto body, baker, carpentry, culinary, cosmetology, electrical, welding/fabrication, heavy equipment operation, and plumbing and refrigeration.9

A UCP government will work with industry to create a teaching competency credential that can be gained on the job, and which would be considered an equivalent to a requisite degree that would allow qualified tradespersons to serve as educators in secondary schools.  

Modernize Alberta Employment Standards Code10to enable junior high school students to work in co-op programs on job sites.

The current Alberta Employment Standards limits 13-14 years old to the following jobs without a government permit: clerk or messenger in an office or retail store; delivery person for small goods and merchandise for a retail store; delivering flyers, newspapers, and handbills of certain duties in the restaurant/food services industry (see Restaurant/Food Services Industry); An artistic endeavour, with a permit from Employment Standards; and Work not listed above with a permit from Employment Standards.11

These rules can preclude young people from getting valuable experience on the job site.

A UCP government will amend the Alberta Employment Standards Code to enable junior high school students to work on different job sites. This is common feature of the Germanic dual training system in such countries as Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, where work co-ops for junior high school students help to inform their decisions about what kind of apprenticeship programs to enroll in.12

Appoint a Skills for Jobs Task Force to report to the government on how to reform education in order to expand opportunities for vocational education and the skilled trades.

The platform sets out immediate steps to try to expand apprenticeship and vocational training in the province to help realize the German model’s “parity of esteem” between experiential and academic learning, and between trades and professions.

But there is more to be done to better support this goal – including examining how to better streamline training and credentialing, ensure that the provincial grants and loans model supports these goals, and that the education system is more responsive to labour market needs.

A UCP government will therefore establish a Skills for Jobs Task Force to report to the government on medium- and long-term reforms to expand opportunities for vocational education and the skilled trades in the province.

Increase support for Skills Canada Alberta, a non-profit group dedicated to the promotion of careers in technology and skilled trade, so that young Albertans can participate in its Skills Canada National Competition and demonstrate their skills and talent on the national and world stage. 

Skills Canada Alberta is a provincial non-profit organization that was established in 1992 to promote careers in skilled trades and technologies to Alberta youth. 

It participates, along with Skills Canada, in hosting a national skills competition and supporting Canadian youth to participate in similar global competitions. It is a great model to expose young Albertans to the opportunities from the trades and technology.

Skills Canada Alberta receives government funding from the Ministries of Alberta Education and the federal Department of Employment and Social Development. The organization is currently on a three-year agreement with the Alberta government for $1.5M per year.

A UCP government will support these important efforts by increasing funding by one-third, (another $500,000 per year).

Support the creation of an Alberta Trades Hall of Fame to honour Albertan tradespeople who have made a difference in our province.

A UCP government will work with colleges, polytechnics, and trade unions to create a new Alberta Trades Hall of Fame to honour Albertan tradespeople who have made a difference in our province. Many of the most important innovations in our economy have been created by tradespeople. This would form part of our effort to create a “parity of esteem” between trades and professions, which experts identify as the most important factor in the success of the Germanic dual training model. 

The Hall of Fame will have both a bricks-and-mortar and virtual component for people to see how tradespeople have helped build the province.

Expand the Women Building Futures program to support women who wish to pursue opportunities in the skilled trades.

Women Building Futures (WBF) is a non-profit organization that, since 1998, has been a leader in preparing women for economically prosperous careers in industries where women have historically been under-represented, such as the skilled trades.

WBF has experience in recruiting and ensuring career success for women at an employment rate of 90 per cent – including 34 percent of graduates who are Indigenous women – and a 132 per cent average increase in salary on first day of hire. They have a training centre in Edmonton, and now in Wood Buffalo, Fort McMurray. They have many partners and have established the WBF Family of Endowed Funds. Canadian businesses can get up to two-thirds of their employee training costs covered through the Canada Alberta Job Grant.13

A UCP government will expand provincial support for the WBF with a particular focus on apprenticeships, skilled trades, and vocational education. We propose a $2.5M increase in provincial funding would amount to a roughly 50 per cent increase for the organization.

Work with other provinces and territories to better harmonize provincial mobility for apprentices and skilled tradespeople.

The New West Partnership and other provincial agreements enable some interprovincial labour mobility but it is still too difficult for apprentices to move between provinces and continue their work and education.

A UCP government will work with other provinces and territories with the goal of fully harmonizing apprenticeship training and rules to enable greater interprovincial mobility for apprentices and skilled tradespeople. Example: this means that a second-year apprentice who moves from Ontario to Alberta will not lose hours or credit toward trade certification in Alberta.

Expand the apprenticeship model to other careers such as coding, green technologies, and others.

Presently Alberta government’s policy is generally focused on roughly 50 skilled trades.14This is relevant for the design of educational funding, student grants and loans, and various other policy-related areas – including the apprenticeship model.

A UCP government will expand the apprenticeship model to cover new and emerging careers such as coding and green technologies to give young Albertans more on-the-job training and bring them closer to labour market opportunities.

For More Information, Please See Below

  • Funding for CAREERS: Next Generation – $4.3 million extra by 2022/23 and $6 million extra per year by 2023/24
  • Blue Ribbon panel – $500K over two years.
  • Skills Canada Alberta – $500K per year.
  • Experiential learning pilot program – $1.5M per year for three years.
  • Funding for Women Building Futures – $2.5M per year.
  • Trades Scholarship – $1M per year.
  • Trades Hall of Fame – $1M in one-time capital costs over two years.

 

As Minister of Employment and Social Development in Stephen Harper’s government, Jason Kenney led the implementation of the federal Skills Agenda that sought to increase significantly support for apprenticeship learning and trades training, including:

Launching the Canada Apprentice Loans.15

Launching the Canada Job Grant16

Implementing the Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit17

Implementing the Apprenticeship Incentive and Apprenticeship Completion Grants18

Kenney validators while Minister of Employment and Social Development

Kenney moved to Minister of Employment & Soc Dev
“Wherever Kenney goes, that portfolio is now important.” – Duane Bratt (political analyst at Mount Royal University), Vancouver Sun, July 16, 2013

Achieve results (Canada Jobs Grant)
“Mr. Kenney‘s critics accuse him of being a bull who travels with his own china shop. He has certainly left shattered crockery in his wake wherever he’s been. But even his former bureaucrats admit he is a rare minister who can achieve results, even while delivering bad news, because he manages to look people in the eye, acknowledge the reasons why they don’t want to do something, and still persuade them they should.” – John Iveson, National Post, October 25, 2013

Dynamic Mr. Kenney (Canada Jobs Grant)
“The dynamic Mr. Kenney is determined to streamline the system, just as he did at Immigration.” – John Iveson, National Post, October 25, 2013

Mission Impossible (Canada Jobs Grant)
“Jason Kenney was made employment minister last summer and immediately handed Mission Impossible.” – John Iveson, National Post, January 9th, 2014

Minister for Workfare (Canada Jobs Grant) 
“But if the Jobs Grant can be made to succeed, he will have earned the title Minister for Workfare, generating a net contribution from employees who might otherwise have been stuck at a desk learning to rewrite a resume.” – John Iveson, National Post, January 9th, 2014

Man in charge
“Federal Employment Minister Jason Kenney is never far from the news as this country deals with multiple challenges on the job front. Whether it’s the controversy surrounding the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, underemployment or an aging workforce, Kenney is the man in charge.” – Jessica Barrett, Calgary Herald, October 15, 2014

Alberta was once a workers’ paradise. Earnings of men with an apprenticeship certificate in the province were close to the earnings of men with a bachelor’s degree in the province and higher than those of men with a bachelor’s degree in all the other provinces.19

In 2015, the gap between someone with an apprenticeship certificate and a bachelor’s degree was only 5.5% in Alberta in 2015. It was 12.5% nationally.19

Yet that situation has since worsened. Statistics Canada data show employment and earnings declines in Alberta across virtually every sector.

Thousands of young people have given up looking for work. Youth participation in Alberta’s economy is also dropping, to a record low of 62% in 2018, down from nearly 71% in 2015.

A staggering number have been out-of-work for two years or more and the number of young men without a job has never been higher since Statistics Canada began measuring this statistic in the 1960s.

The Youth Unemployment Rate is now 11.6%, up from 10.7% when the NDP came to office

37,200 young Albertans are looking for work

Forty five percent20of young Albertan men between the ages of 15 and 24 are out of work or have given up looking for work, the highest rate in statistical history. 21

Notwithstanding the current economic challenges, Alberta will have an ongoing demand for apprentices and skilled tradespeople as older skilled workers leave the workforce. According to provincial statistics, Albertans aged 55 to 64 made up 15 per cent of Alberta’s working-age population in 2016. This compares to 12 per cent in 2006.

Alberta’s Department of Labour anticipates more than 3,000 workers will retire in the trades, transport and equipment operators, and related occupations each year from 2016 to 2025.22   The Dean of the School of Manufacturing and Automation at SAIT has described these trends as a “grey wave.”22

It is essential that provincial policy gets ahead of these trends and enables more young people to pursue apprenticeships, work in the skilled trades, and have access to vocational education.

To address these issues, United Conservatives have an ambitious plan to increase opportunities for young people to enter the skilled trades, to expand vocational education, and to promote well-paid skilled work as equally and every bit as desirable as a university education.

To achieve these goals, a UCP government would:

1) Double the number of schools that CAREERS: Next Generation is currently working with, from 500 to 1,000,1 and quadruple the number of students placed with participating employers. 

CAREERS: Next Generation’ is a non-profit organization that matches Alberta students to employers through internships, camps, workshops and mentoring – including in the skilled trades.2 In 2018, there were 1,567 students enrolled in programs as varied as interning at Dow Chemicals, or the Royal Bank3.

CAREERS currently places 1,500 students and apprentices with industry placements but has developed a plan to reach 6,000 students and apprentices.

CAREERS: Next Generation has tremendous private-sector buy-in. Its partner companies and funders read like a “who’s-who” of Alberta’s most successful philanthropists and businesses.

CAREERS presently receives approximately $2 million per year from the provincial government.4

To achieve these ambitious goals, a UCP government would increase provincial funding to CAREERS by an extra $4.3 million annually by 2022/23 and $6 million by 2023/24.

2) Expand the number of students enrolled in the Registered Apprenticeship Program, (as part of the UCP commitment to CAREERS: Next Generation.)

The Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) is an opportunity for high school students to complete a high school diploma while also working as an indentured apprentice, earning credits. They build hours towards a Journeyman’s Certificate in one of Alberta’s more than fifty trades. Worksites are approved, a learning plan is established, and a teacher supervises the student’s experience.

RAP students are both full-time students and registered apprentices, dividing their school time between both approved work sites and their high school studies. They continue to take all the regular courses such as English, Language Arts, Social Studies and Math in order to obtain their high school diploma. Both the school and the employer agree on a schedule for the student.  

This allows the student to earn good wages and obtain as many as 40 high school credits.

For a semester, students work for half a day of each school day, for one or two days per week, including during summer holidays, and holidays and weekends during the school year.

The program ends when the apprentice finishes high school. This helps them get a head start by accumulating hours toward their ticket, completing health and safety training, and sometimes completing their first year of apprenticeship.

Graduating students are automatically registered as a regular apprentice and the credit earned while in the RAP program is applied to his or her apprenticeship through the apprenticeship program. At this time about 80 percent of their time will be spent on the job and the rest will be spent at a technical institute or college.

Once they have completed all necessary work hours and technical training, they become a certified journeyperson.

Offices are located in various cities and towns across Alberta.

3) Establish a new $1 million Trades Scholarship for 1,000 graduating secondary students who show promise in the trades in high school. This will be a new annual scholarship of $1,000 available in addition to existing scholarships.

The budget for the new scholarship is estimated to be $1 million per year and would enough to award up to 1,000 annual scholarships of $1,000 per recipient, including renewed scholarships of existing recipients (up to four years). 

4) Support the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology’s new collegiate in Edmonton5and aim to expand this model to Calgary and other centres. The province’s contribution under a United Conservative government will be $28 million towards the NAIT collegiate6 and we will also budget $28 million for a similar Calgary collegiate. 

A planned Edmonton high school, an alternative model that is reportedly the first of its kind in North America, will allow students to fast-track to their post-secondary education (PSE). The new collegiate, the result of a partnership between the Edmonton Catholic and Public School Boards, the Government of Alberta, and the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, will focus on students interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics courses, with students being able to earn PSE credits as early as grade 11. The school will be built on land just east of NAIT, allowing students to have access to the institution’s labs.

5) Reform teacher certification to enable qualified tradespeople to teach and bring their skills to the classroom without requiring a full Bachelor of Education.7

Given the time This excludes a huge pool of expertise that exists in the trades industries from teaching young students in the classroom. And many tradespersons will soon approach retirement. These individuals could bring their expertise and enthusiasm for the skilled trades into the classroom.

The goal here will be to replicate the training and certification now in effect at NAIT to become a Master Instructor (to teach at NAIT)8 but for schools across Alberta.

The University of Alberta currently runs a program called the Bridge to Teach program which supports journey certified tradespeople, health care, and information technology professionals to complete a one-year program to bridge to teacher certification. It only applies to 10 trades: auto mechanic, auto body, baker, carpentry, culinary, cosmetology, electrical, welding/fabrication, heavy equipment operation, and plumbing and refrigeration.9

A UCP government will work with industry to create a teaching competency credential that can be gained on the job, and which would be considered an equivalent to a requisite degree that would allow qualified tradespersons to serve as educators in secondary schools.  

6) Modernize Alberta Employment Standards Code10to enable junior high school students to work in co-op programs on job sites.

The current Alberta Employment Standards limits 13-14 years old to the following jobs without a government permit: clerk or messenger in an office or retail store; delivery person for small goods and merchandise for a retail store; delivering flyers, newspapers, and handbills of certain duties in the restaurant/food services industry (see Restaurant/Food Services Industry); An artistic endeavour, with a permit from Employment Standards; and Work not listed above with a permit from Employment Standards.11

These rules can preclude young people from getting valuable experience on the job site.

A UCP government will amend the Alberta Employment Standards Code to enable junior high school students to work on different job sites. This is common feature of the Germanic dual training system in such countries as Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, where work co-ops for junior high school students help to inform their decisions about what kind of apprenticeship programs to enroll in.12

7) Appoint a Skills for Jobs Task Force to report to the government on how to reform education in order to expand opportunities for vocational education and the skilled trades.

The platform sets out immediate steps to try to expand apprenticeship and vocational training in the province to help realize the German model’s “parity of esteem” between experiential and academic learning, and between trades and professions.

But there is more to be done to better support this goal – including examining how to better streamline training and credentialing, ensure that the provincial grants and loans model supports these goals, and that the education system is more responsive to labour market needs.

A UCP government will therefore establish a Skills for Jobs Task Force to report to the government on medium- and long-term reforms to expand opportunities for vocational education and the skilled trades in the province.

8) Increase support for Skills Canada Alberta, a non-profit group dedicated to the promotion of careers in technology and skilled trade, so that young Albertans can participate in its Skills Canada National Competition and demonstrate their skills and talent on the national and world stage. 

Skills Canada Alberta is a provincial non-profit organization that was established in 1992 to promote careers in skilled trades and technologies to Alberta youth. 

It participates, along with Skills Canada, in hosting a national skills competition and supporting Canadian youth to participate in similar global competitions. It is a great model to expose young Albertans to the opportunities from the trades and technology.

Skills Canada Alberta receives government funding from the Ministries of Alberta Education and the federal Department of Employment and Social Development. The organization is currently on a three-year agreement with the Alberta government for $1.5M per year.

A UCP government will support these important efforts by increasing funding by one-third, (another $500,000 per year).

9) Support the creation of an Alberta Trades Hall of Fame to honour Albertan tradespeople who have made a difference in our province.

A UCP government will work with colleges, polytechnics, and trade unions to create a new Alberta Trades Hall of Fame to honour Albertan tradespeople who have made a difference in our province. Many of the most important innovations in our economy have been created by tradespeople. This would form part of our effort to create a “parity of esteem” between trades and professions, which experts identify as the most important factor in the success of the Germanic dual training model. 

The Hall of Fame will have both a bricks-and-mortar and virtual component for people to see how tradespeople have helped build the province.

10) Expand the Women Building Futures program to support women who wish to pursue opportunities in the skilled trades.

Women Building Futures (WBF) is a non-profit organization that, since 1998, has been a leader in preparing women for economically prosperous careers in industries where women have historically been under-represented, such as the skilled trades.

WBF has experience in recruiting and ensuring career success for women at an employment rate of 90 per cent – including 34 percent of graduates who are Indigenous women – and a 132 per cent average increase in salary on first day of hire. They have a training centre in Edmonton, and now in Wood Buffalo, Fort McMurray. They have many partners and have established the WBF Family of Endowed Funds. Canadian businesses can get up to two-thirds of their employee training costs covered through the Canada Alberta Job Grant.13

A UCP government will expand provincial support for the WBF with a particular focus on apprenticeships, skilled trades, and vocational education. We propose a $2.5M increase in provincial funding would amount to a roughly 50 per cent increase for the organization.

11) Work with other provinces and territories to better harmonize provincial mobility for apprentices and skilled tradespeople.

The New West Partnership and other provincial agreements enable some interprovincial labour mobility but it is still too difficult for apprentices to move between provinces and continue their work and education.

A UCP government will work with other provinces and territories with the goal of fully harmonizing apprenticeship training and rules to enable greater interprovincial mobility for apprentices and skilled tradespeople. Example: this means that a second-year apprentice who moves from Ontario to Alberta will not lose hours or credit toward trade certification in Alberta.

12) Expand the apprenticeship model to other careers such as coding, green technologies, and others.

Presently Alberta government’s policy is generally focused on roughly 50 skilled trades.14This is relevant for the design of educational funding, student grants and loans, and various other policy-related areas – including the apprenticeship model.

A UCP government will expand the apprenticeship model to cover new and emerging careers such as coding and green technologies to give young Albertans more on-the-job training and bring them closer to labour market opportunities.

The School Act and the Education Act require Alberta teachers to hold a certificate of qualification, and give the Minister power to make regulations “governing the issuing of certificates…[and] respecting education, training and experience, character and other eligibility requirements of applicants for certificates.”23 The Certification of Teachers Regulation currently requires that applicants hold a Bachelor of Education or its equivalent.24

Since 2010, the Bridge-to-Teacher Certification program “supports journey certificated tradespeople, health care and information technology professionals to complete a one-year program to bridge to teacher certification currently offered by University of Alberta.”25 While participants may begin teaching following completion of this pre-service program, they are still required to complete a B.Ed. eventually. Participants in this program receive a $50,000 financial assistance grant from Alberta Education. School boards must apply for the program, and it is unclear whether an individual could enter the program, grant or no grant, without board sponsorship. This program is currently only available through the University of Alberta.

While the entire system is premised on teachers having or working toward a B.Ed., it appears that these requirements are only set out in regulation, not in legislation. Notably, the Teaching Profession Act, which establishes the Alberta Teachers’ Association, does not address requirements for certification. As a result, the Minister of Education likely already possesses the authority to spearhead reforms to the certification process aimed at creating a smoother path to certification for tradespeople.

To read the News Release, please click here

  1. See: https://www.careersnextgen.ca/about/[🠝][🠝]
  2. https://www.careersnextgen.ca/home/stories/.[🠝][🠝]
  3. https://www.careersnextgen.ca/home/stories/[🠝][🠝]
  4. See: https://www.careersnextgen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/final-signed-financial-statements-2017.pdf[🠝][🠝]
  5. See: https://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/collegiate-planned-for-edmonton-to-be-first-of-its-kind-in-north-america-1.2071863.[🠝][🠝]
  6. From: Edmonton Catholic School Board 2019 Capital Plan, the $28 million is the ECSB’s portion of the funding for NAIT Collegiate. The other partners are the Government of Alberta ($28 million), Edmonton Public School Board ($28 million) and NAIT ($28 million). The total project cost thus is $112 million. We assume and budget a similar figure for a possible Calgary collegiate.[🠝][🠝]
  7. See Backgrounder at end of document: Teacher Certification for Tradespeople: How it works now[🠝][🠝]
  8. http://www.nait.ca/program_home_16569.htm[🠝][🠝]
  9. See: https://education.alberta.ca/bridge-to-teacher-certification/bridge-to-teacher-certification-program/.[🠝][🠝]
  10. See: http://www.qp.alberta.ca/documents/Acts/E09.pdf.[🠝][🠝]
  11. See: https://www.alberta.ca/youth-employment-laws.aspx.[🠝][🠝]
  12. https://www.bmbf.de/upload_filestore/pub/Berufsbildungsbericht_2015_eng.pdf[🠝][🠝]
  13. See: https://www.womenbuildingfutures.com/docs/default-source/reports-docs/wbf-17-report-to-the-community_final.pdf.[🠝][🠝]
  14. See: https://tradesecrets.alberta.ca/trades-occupations/trades-occupations-list/.[🠝][🠝]
  15. See: https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/minister-jason-kenney-highlights-government-of-canada-support-for-apprenticeships-at-skilled-trades-summit-514409711.html.[🠝]
  16. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ottawa-reaches-agreement-in-principle-on-job-grant-with-provinces-except-quebec/article17160343/[🠝]
  17. https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-412-investment-tax-credit/apprenticeship-job-creation-tax-credit.html?wbdisable=true[🠝]
  18. https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/apprentices/grants.html?utm_campaign=not-applicable&utm_medium=vanity-url&utm_source=canada-ca_apprenticeship-grants[🠝]
  19. See: https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/as-sa/98-200-x/2016024/98-200-x2016024-eng.cfm.[🠝][🠝]
  20. Trevor Tombe, quoted by Licia Corbella: https://calgaryherald.com/opinion/columnists/corbella-disastrous-policies-have-created-desperate-times-for-albertas-young-men[🠝]
  21. See: https://calgaryherald.com/opinion/columnists/corbella-disastrous-policies-have-created-desperate-times-for-albertas-young-men[🠝]
  22. See: https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/oil-jobs-boomers-1.4576056.[🠝][🠝]
  23. School Act 94(1)(a)(iii); Education Act 201(1)(a)(iii).[🠝]
  24. Certification of Teachers Regulation 7(1) & 7(2).[🠝]
  25. https://education.alberta.ca/bridge-to-teacher-certification/bridge-to-teacher-certification-program/[🠝]
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Creating Oil and Gas Jobs

Alberta’s energy sector has seen our province thrive for generations. The United Conservatives’ energy policy would ensure we manage our resources responsibly while bringing back jobs for the hard-working men and women employed in the oil & gas industry.

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Standing Up For Alberta, Getting Pipelines Built

Pipelines are how we get our oil and gas to market for sale. The lack of pipeline capacity causes the price for our oil to go down and prevents further investment. A United Conservative government will pursue every pipeline project to get our oil and gas to market.

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